Tag Archives: Transfiguration of the Lord

Shining Like the Son

A Sermon for 3 March 2019 – Transfiguration of the Lord

A reading from the gospel of Luke 9:28-43. Listen for God’s word to us.

“Now about eight days after these sayings Jesus took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray. And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly they saw two men, Moses and Elijah, talking to him. They appeared in glory and were speaking of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem. Now Peter and his companions were weighed down with sleep; but since they had stayed awake, they saw his glory and the two men who stood with him. Just as they were leaving him, Peter said to Jesus, “Master, it is good for us to be here; let us make three dwellings, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah”—not knowing what he said. While he was saying this, a cloud came and overshadowed them; and they were terrified as they entered the cloud. Then from the cloud came a voice that said, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!” When the voice had spoken, Jesus was found alone. And they kept silent and in those days told no one any of the things they had seen. On the next day, when they had come down from the mountain, a great crowd met him. Just then a man from the crowd shouted, “Teacher, I beg you to look at my son; he is my only child. Suddenly a spirit seizes him, and all at once he shrieks. It convulses him until he foams at the mouth; it mauls him and will scarcely leave him. I begged your disciples to cast it out, but they could not.” Jesus answered, “You faithless and perverse generation, how much longer must I be with you and bear with you? Bring your son here.” While he was coming, the demon dashed him to the ground in convulsions. But Jesus rebuked the unclean spirit, healed the boy, and gave him back to his father. And all were astounded at the greatness of God.”

This is the word of God for the people of God. Thanks be to God!

 

You’ve heard it said that beautiful brides radiate. And once their bellies get big and round, everyone agrees that pregnant women have that glow. Anyone excitedly welcoming a newborn talks about them being a bundle of warmth – as if the sweetness of God reflects right through them. When parents are as proud as can be, they beam at their children. And of course, two people in love look at each other and their eyes light up an entire room.

Thomas Merton, one of the 20th Century’s most well-known monks, is famous for his epiphany in downtown Louisville on March 18, 1958. He said: “In Louisville, at the corner of Fourth and Walnut, in the center of the shopping district, I was suddenly overwhelmed with the realization that I loved all those people, that they were mine and I theirs, that we could not be alien to one another even though we were total strangers.” He said, “It is a glorious destiny to be a member of the human race . . . there is no way of telling people they are all walking around shining like the sun.” . . . He went on to explain that on that day he “suddenly saw the secret beauty of their hearts, the depths of their hearts where neither sin nor desire nor self-knowledge can reach, the core of their reality, the person that each one is in God’s eyes.” Merton wrote, “If only they could all see themselves as they really are. If only we could see each other that way all of the time. There would be no more war, no more hatred, no more cruelty, no more greed” (Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander, New York: Doubleday, 1996 – http://merton.org/TMSQ.aspx).

Buried in the book of Daniel, the prophet exclaims that “Those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the sky, and those who lead many to righteousness (shall twinkle) like the stars forever and ever” (Daniel 12:3).

The Exodus reading assigned by the lectionary for Transfiguration Sunday – and referred to in 2 Corinthians, which often is read on Transfiguration Sunday as well. The Exodus reading names Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the tablets of the Law. He was up on the mountaintop – in the presence or Shekinah of God. What he didn’t know as he descended from that amazing experience of being with God was that his face shone brightly – the light of God’s presence was reflecting on Moses’ skin. (Exodus 34:29-35).

Jesus himself has some sort of experience. It may not have been exactly the same. But we hear of the way Jesus was transfigured on the mountain. He’s up there praying – just eight days after he told his disciples what lie ahead. Peter, John, and James are with him. While he’s deep in prayer, they look up to see “the appearance of Jesus’ face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white” (Luke 9:29). He’s transformed before their eyes. That radiance. That glow. That beaming shine like the bright summer sun. The presence of God glows right through his skin. It’s as if on that mountain, all with eyes to see finally behold the core of Christ’s reality. Who he really is: the one in whom God in-full dwells. A voice even confirms it saying: “This is my Son, the Chosen; listen to him!” (Luke 9:35)

Now, it may seem like quite a leap, but we can think about worship just like that. In Celebration of Discipline, by Richard Foster, worship is defined as: “when (upper case S) Spirit touches (lower case s) spirit” (Celebration of Discipline, Richard Foster, 1998, p. 159). When the Holy Spirit of God connects with the spirit of God alive in us. Worship is when we get plugged in. Re-charged. Spirit unites with spirit, which we know can happen anywhere in this God-breathed creation. So that sometimes it just happens. Walking along an autumn path, the rays of the sunshine just so that it seems the world is transfixed into heaven-like streets of gold. Or any number of such unexpected, take-your-breath-away life moments that leave us speechless in awe. The times we’re not ready for God’s Spirit to wake up the one slumbering in us. And the times we actually get ourselves ready: prime the pump, it’s often called. When we go to a particular place – like here – where it seems a thin place between common and extraordinary. Holy and mundane. We attune ourselves to connect with that which is Beyond. Spirit touches spirit: worship!

It’s what the Apostle Paul is referring to when he writes that “all of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord – as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image (of the Lord) from one degree of glory to another” (2 Cor. 3:18). Worship is about that connection. Seeing the glory of God. Celebrating the glory of God. Being in the glorious presence of God and never finding ourselves the same thereafter. . . . Like those disciples. Think about them. Most probably they weren’t up on that mountain to worship. I’m guessing they only went because Jesus’ asked them to. Kinda like a president’s bodyguards who have to follow around where ever the president goes. They either felt it their responsibility as Jesus’ trustworthy friends to make that trek up. Or maybe they curiously were trying to develop a prayer habit of their own. . . . According to the story, they make the climb and sit nearby as if casual observers. They planned to just sit around to watch as their dear friend Jesus prays. But what’s about to take place on that mountain isn’t something they’re able casually to observe. In the Presence of God, they’re pulled in. They hear God’s voice. And they are called to heed. Though they are silent upon the descent, eventually their sealed lips will be broken and they will be charged to go into all the world filled in the same way — with the power of the same Spirit — to witness in word and deed to the ends of the earth. . . . Worship is about that – that encounter which transforms. Our spirits unite with God’s Spirit in that glorious high that requires us then to go forth changed. Transformed to reflect God’s glory. You might even say transfigured ourselves to heed the call of Christ. Which is why there should be a sign at the sanctuary entrance that we’re all required to read on our way in: Warning – enter at your own risk, because you cannot leave here the same!

I once read a story about a preacher who tells what he saw as a young boy in the face of another man. Supposedly as a child, this would-be preacher encountered a missionary just home on furlough who was on fire for God. When first the boy saw him, he ran to get the neighborhood priest to ask who this man was. The boy was so impressed by the joy that exuded from that missionary. He never had seen someone all aglow like that. He claimed in his memoirs, which he wrote near the end of his life; that he went on to commit his life to serving God in professional ministry – largely because of the moment he encountered that missionary. He confessed that he never could get away from the influence of the light he saw radiating from that man. A shining face – glowing with the love, with the joy of Christ. The experience changed that boy’s life entirely. . . . Which just goes to show that time spent with God – Spirit connecting with spirit – true worship has power we never can underestimate. . . . Shining like the Son, may we go forth to light up the world!

© Copyright JMN – 2019  (All rights reserved.)

Transfiguration: A Transformation Metaphor

DISCLAIMER: I believe sermons are meant to be heard. They are the word proclaimed in a live exchange between God and the preacher, and the preacher and God, and the preacher and the people, and the people and the preacher, and the people and God, and God and the people. Typically set in the context of worship and always following the reading of scripture, sermons are about listening and speaking and hearing and heeding. At the risk of stepping outside such boundaries, I share sermons here — where the reader will have to wade through a manuscript that was created to be spoken word. Even if you don’t know the sound of my voice, let yourself hear as you read. Let your mind see as you hear. Let your life be opened to whatever response you begin to hear within you.

May the Spirit Speak to you!
RevJule
______________________

15 February 2015 – Transfiguration Sunday
Click here to read scripture first:  http://www.biblestudytools.com/nrsa/mark/passage/?q=mark+9:2-10

Even though I wasn’t good at the guessing last week: for those of you who attended our church history celebration last week and brought in your baby photos, wasn’t that fun? Seeing so many of us from just a few years back? . . . Being able to see the dimples that remain in some, the eyes that gave you away, the smiles that never change. It was so good to see each other at different stages in our lives. It got me thinking about how much each of us has changed over the years. I mean, think about it: since those baby photos were taken, how much have you grown, learned, done? Aspects of us might always stay the same so that we remain recognizable – at least to ourselves. But so much more of who we are has changed dramatically. We no longer are just those sweet lil faces in the photos. Each of us has grown and adapted on such unique journeys through the path that is called our, individual life.

For some reason, those photos from last week remind me of the other change we’re hearing about in the gospel reading for today. It’s Transfiguration Sunday so it’s not just any old change the gospel of Mark writes about. It’s Jesus. Pretty much at the half-way point of the story between his baptism and his death and resurrection, it’s almost as if Jesus deliberately wanted to transfigure for them. According to the gospel of Mark’s record of it, six days after Jesus first tells his disciples that the path he’s following will lead to his death, but not to worry because three days after that he will be raised again. Six days after Jesus first tells how this all is going to go down; he leads Peter, James, and John up a mountain.

Now, mountains are important for Jesus and his people. Those first disciples certainly knew that. Significant encounters with God took place on mountains. On the top of a mountain, Moses too ended up with a glowing face. On the top of a mountain, the great prophet Elijah came face to face with God. And on the top of this mountain Jesus and his friends are climbing, a voice is going to tell these three lead disciples to LISTEN to what Jesus had to say. And, it wasn’t some big pronouncement he was about to make – like the transfiguration and the voice were the trumpets pre-message to get everyone’s attention for the most important words that are about to be spoken. No: Jesus already had told them the most important words they needed to hear.

In Caesarea Philippi – the ancient place where folks retreated for restful restoration at Mount Hermon’s Banias Waterfalls, which happen to be the source of the north to south waters that make up the eastern border of the land of Israel. There at the geographic start of it all, Jesus asks them who they believe he is. After Peter correctly answers: “You are the Messiah” (Mark 8:29), he and the others refuse to accept the definition of Messiah that Jesus gives. Because Jesus is the Messiah, the anointed One of the God who isn’t quite as some might expect. Jesus tells that he is going to suffer, be rejected, and killed, before he finally rises again (Mark 8:31). It’s a natural human response, I think, to want it not to be so. I mean, who among us wants to suffer. Rejection hurts – it can crush our egos all together. None of us actually want to be killed – literally or metaphorically. We know this or things like swallowing our pride, and starting over after a divorce, and saying goodbye to our loved ones on their deathbeds wouldn’t be as hard as they always seem to be. Though Jesus never attempts to tell why it must be this way, it just is. Resurrection comes only after death. And just to be sure those disciples actually LISTEN and ready themselves to live likewise, the appearance of Jesus changes dramatically as a voice calls: “This is my Son, the Beloved. LISTEN to him!” (Mark 9:7).

Jesus changes – transfigures with the light of God shining right on through his eyes because he needs his disciples to know that they will need to change too.  Step by step becoming a little bit more like him.

It’s the path of transformation to which he calls us. Of dying to self daily in order to follow behind this God revealed in-full in Jesus. And transfiguration, at least according to the gospel of Mark’s telling of it, shows some of the classic human responses to change. Did you notice that? As soon as Jesus is transfigured and a few other bodies appear along with him, Peter proposes they hold on to the moment. Settle in to things as they are and never let go. Resist all future change. He suggests they make three dwellings – perhaps reminiscent of the annual Jewish Feast of Booths which originally celebrated God’s provision through the 40 years of wilderness wanderings and eventually commemorated the magnificent harvests of the Promised Land. Perhaps Peter intended those dwellings as symbolic of the one Moses came down Mount Sinai the second time with instructions for. He had been told how to build the Tabernacle or the place for the Dwelling of God. Either way, Peter is missing the point. The glorious change of Jesus they are experiencing is not for the purpose of clinging to that exact spot. It’s for them to heed the warning that the life of discipleship will look like his: giving ourselves away, no matter the cost, in order to be raised again. It’s a new way of life they are to learn. Being transformed bit by bit.

As the story unfolds, fear sets in next. Of Jesus transfiguration, the gospels all record the human response of absolute terror. Fear. We know this stuff, right? . . . Fear so often is a part of any process of change. Transformation is tough. Opening ourselves to being changed is consenting to a process in which one thing is certain:  uncertainty.  Something most of us don’t really like. We never can know what it all will be like as we change. Those disciples never could have guessed they eventually would break away from their Jewish ways as they gathered and grew into a whole new way of being. They couldn’t have imagined traveling to far-away places or staying close to home to tell people they didn’t really know about the gracious love of God, which they experienced in Christ. The healing and helping and outpouring of the Holy Spirit they came to know as they followed after him. We know they were afraid – they scattered in the garden when Jesus was arrested. They hid while he was crucified. They were in shock at the message of his resurrection. . . . Do you know those wonderful words of Eleanor Roosevelt? Cuz it sorta seems like the first disciples needed her pep talk: “You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do” (Eleanor Roosevelt, pinterest.com/overcoming fear quotes). This week I also came across these words regarding fear: “Fear is an idea-crippling, experience-crushing, success-stalling inhibitor inflicted only by yourself” (Stephanie Melish, Ibid.).

This process of transformation to which the transfigured Jesus calls us reminds me of the practice of courage I once heard about. It was an assignment for some class. To come up with one daily discipline and journal about it for 30 days prior to the start of the class. I guess one woman found her life incredibly settled – probably because she felt afraid of everything. So she created the practice of courage to see what might happen. Every day for her 30 day assignment, she had to shake it up. She had to do one thing she had never done before – especially if it was something she was afraid to do. She reported to the class that some days were little things like taking a new route home from work or eating at a restaurant she’d never been to before. Some days things were a bit tougher, like actually having the conversation with her boss about what had been bothering her for months at work. One thing she did, as a novice violinist who had never played in front of anybody but her teacher and her teacher’s other students, that woman practicing courage entered a talent show and played an introductory solo violin piece in front of 500 people. She reported to the class that her fingers nearly sweated off the strings and it might not have sounded like Yo Yo Ma, but she did it. She looked fear in the face and did something she never dreamed she could accomplish. During the practice of courage, every night she kept the journal required for the class. There she’d tell of what courageous new thing she did, what she noticed as she did it, and any other insights she was gaining from that intentional commitment to doing something new. She told how it was getting a bit easier to do new things and how fear was beginning to be less of a driving force in her life. . . . Upon reading the student’s final paper on the practice, the instructor of the class was so inspired by the process that she decided to give the practice of courage a try too and even encouraged others to do so as a way to grow deeper in discipleship of Christ.

Maybe it’s a practice some of us might want to take up for the season of Lent that’s sneaking up on us. A great way to begin to gain a little more breathing room in the face of any fear. Try one new thing each day – especially something that terrifies us – and pay attention to what happens in us along the way. Bit by bit changing. Transforming into who God intends for us to be. Be it scary. Slow. Unwelcomed even. But what a glorious journey the transfigured Jesus calls his followers to undertake. May we open ourselves a little bit more to the amazing process!

In the name of the life-giving Father, the life-redeeming Son, and the life-sustaining Spirit, Amen.

© Copyright JMN – 2015